Welcome to our very first Email Story! We figured people get enough newsletters, so we wanted to do something a little different and share stories of our experiences in Bermuda. We hope this will inspire you to explore this beautiful island as well!

EXPLORING A BERMUDA SHIPWRECK

With most of us staying at home during this pandemic, we thought it would be a nice activity to go exploring from our living rooms. As many of you already know, Bermuda is the perfect place to go exploring!

Last summer we had a family snorkeling adventure around one of Bermuda’s shipwrecks. We explored the shipwreck called Sea Fern, located on the northern side of Nonsuch Island in Castle Harbour.

Nonsuch Island is a protected wildlife island where Bermuda conservationists are working on bringing back the almost-extinct Bermuda native bird the Cahow. To the north of this island lies the shipwreck Sea Fern. It was re-wrecked by Nonsuch in the 1930s by the conservationist William Bebee, to form a breakwater and be used as a holding tank to study different species of fish.

Little Known Secret…

When you snorkel over the wreck and peek inside you will see one of its main inhabitants, a giant puffer fish! He lives in there full time and anyone who visits Sea Fern can go and say hello to him. Along with the pufferfish, the wreck is teaming with a variety of fish as colorful as the rainbow. This wreck is a must see for visitors and locals alike!

With most of us staying at home during this pandemic, we thought it would be a nice activity to go exploring from our living rooms. As many of you already know, Bermuda is the perfect place to go exploring!

Last summer we had a family snorkeling adventure around one of Bermuda’s shipwrecks. We explored the shipwreck called Sea Fern, located on the northern side of Nonsuch Island in Castle Harbour.

Nonsuch Island is a protected wildlife island where Bermuda conservationists are working on bringing back the almost-extinct Bermuda native bird the Cahow. To the north of this island lies the shipwreck Sea Fern. It was re-wrecked by Nonsuch in the 1930s by the conservationist William Bebee, to form a breakwater and be used as a holding tank to study different species of fish.

Little Known Secret…

When you snorkel over the wreck and peek inside you will see one of its main inhabitants, a giant puffer fish! He lives in there full time and anyone who visits Sea Fern can go and say hello to him. Along with the pufferfish, the wreck is teaming with a variety of fish as colorful as the rainbow. This wreck is a must see for visitors and locals alike!